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Drakhorn

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About Drakhorn

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  1. Little update here. I haven't continued this project for 2 reasons. 1. The cost efficiency of this is not very good. 2. The cooling capacity of this solution is capped on the boiling point of the liquid used, making this technically a worse solution than just basic air cooling as the liquid would always be hotter than ambient temperature in the room. Custom water cooling solutions scale much better for cooling capacity required. I still think about this every now and then and will consult some of my engineering friends about it so I might update and clean up the first posts in this thread but I will be building a rigid tube water cooled pc as my next project.
  2. The new tubes came from Saint-Gobain and they've etched their labels on the tubes with a laser or something... no way to rub them off
  3. Premades. I used to have Nanoxia CF1 Cooling Fluid Pro Acid Green but now in that last picture I have Aquatuning Protect UV Green.
  4. OK! So after running 5 years I decided to do full maintenance for the rig. The only thing I had done before this was change the liquid once and dust off every other year or something. So I cleaned all the water blocks and radiators, changed the tubes, thermal pads and pastes. Here's what the parts looked like after 5 years if anyone wondered. CPU block was the dirtiest. I think the gunk in the fins is residue from the o-ring. GPU block and pump had barely any residue in them. The paste had turned nasty and the bracket had obvious discolorations on it. That is how it came out, I had not swiped the paste in the middle. The liquid metal had faired well it seems. It had corroded the IHS a little, just enough to make it a little coarse where it was applied. No effect on the die. Tygon tubes had changed color and the liquid itself had clearly more brownish tint than when it went in. No picture of the liquid though. After 24 hours she's back alive.
  5. Fair warning to the beta testers. Don't play the game too much or lose your progression.
  6. Same, I think the game doesn't really have much replayability value so I don't want to spend the experience tip toeing around bugs.
  7. So did the day 1 patch do anything for the bugs?
  8. A friend of mine confirmed that you can disable at least the cpu fan monitoring Can't believe that ASUS either has so dishonest or just incompetent people in technical support department.
  9. A bit off topic and frankly not nearly as "cool" as a submerged pc boiling its coolant with pipes going into the wall. Also not really an option atm for 5900X but something I would seriously consider if going for max cooling. Just to point out, Intel hasn't invented anything new here, they are basically selling you Peltier DC control software packaged in a neat hardware solution that you could build yourself anyways. On another matter. I've hit a weird snag with ASUS customer service. Here's our conversation in terse. Me: Can the CPU_FAN and PCH_FAN connectors be left unplugged? Is there an option in the BIOS to disable any possible fail safes for them? ASUS: No, it is not mentioned in the manual Me: Are you sure? I know it's not in the manual, that's why I am asking because ASUS FAQ website tells me you can disable them: https://www.asus.com/us/support/FAQ/1006064/ ASUS: Unfortunately this function is not working. I havent seen this option in BIOS in any recent board. There are many forum posts and youtube videos showing how to disable monitoring on CPU_FAN connector in ASUS motherboards. Is this some kind of liability avoidance bullshit where they cannot claim this as a feature in case I fry my board and try to RMA it then? Does anyone in here have an ASUS board that could verify that there is an option in BIOS under Monitor to disable the "CPU FAN speed" monitoring? Something like this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qSqnVjcEaSE
  10. Just a thought but what if.... What if I route a cold water line from the wall right next to my pc and plug the whole thing into mains and just flush the water after condensing? hmmm..... According to legislature, cold water cannot exceed temperature of 20C, this would be perfect! Also as the loop has no micro fins I'm not worried about clogging and if I use a copper condenser and brass and soft pipes there should not be a problem with corrosion. As the loop wouldn't be closed there isn't any issues with growths in the system either. hmmm...... AFAIK legislature should not prevent doing this. HOA might have an opinion about it though but will consult a professional about it first. My cold tap water measures 13C which is very nice but could impose condensation problem in the pipe perhaps? Will need to ask about it as well and perhaps insulate the pipe if necessary. hmmm.....
  11. So far it has become apparent that just the price of Novec itself makes this build not the smartest one. Not mentioning the trouble one needs to go with fabricating all the parts needed for the build. So far depending on how the the design lands, this will take about 8-11 liters of the stuff, that's about 2000-2600€ on the liquid alone. You can see why there aren't commercial solutions available to consumers, this isn't the most cost efficient way to build a pc for sure. Still not decided whether to proceed or not. I want to see if this can be made even theoretically first.
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